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Books by Tanith Carey

Tanith Carey is the author of eight books, ranging from biography to social history and parenting.

She writes opinion and features for a wide range of publications including The Daily Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, Good Housekeeping and the Mail on Sunday. 

Tanith's latest book, Mum Hacks, aimed in fact at both mums and dads, tackles the stresses on today's parents and looks at practical ways to make their lives simpler.

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GIRLS, UNINTERRUPTED: Steps for Building Stronger Girls in a challenging world

Why are girls self-harming and suffering eating disorders in record numbers?
Why do girls feel they have to be 'Little Miss Perfects' who are never allowed to fail?

Why are girls turning against each other on social media?
What should we tell girls about how to deal with challenges of every day sexism and violent, misogynistic pornography?
How can parents, teachers and grandparents inoculate girls so they can push back against the barrage of unhealthy messages bombarding them about what it means to be female?

Tired of the same old parenting books that tip-toe vaguely around the issues instead of tackling them head-on? 

Laid out in clear simple steps, 'Girls Uninterrupted' , which was serialised in the The Times, The Mail on Sunday and The Independent, shows the practical strategies you need to create a carefree childhood for your daughters and ultimately help build them into the healthy, resilient women they deserve to be.

REVIEWS

"One of Britain's leading parenting gurus"
– The Mail On Sunday

"A brilliant new parenting book"
– The Huffington Post

"The practical strategies you need to create a carefree childhood for your daughter"
– The Little Book

 

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TAMING THE TIGER PARENT: How to put your child's well-being first in a competitive world

From the moment the umbilical cord is cut, today's parents feel trapped in a never-ending race to ensure their child is the brightest and the best. But while it's completely natural for schools and parents to want children to reach their potential, at what point does too much competition become damaging?

With constant testing in schools also raising the stakes, how can we tell when hot-housing children is actually doing more harm than good? 

In this ground-breaking and provocative book, award-winning journalist and parenting author Tanith Carey presents the latest research on what this contest is doing to the next generation. 

Packed with insights, experts' tips, real experiences and resources, this book is a timely guide to safeguarding your child's well-being in a competitive world - so they can grow into the happy, emotionally balanced people they really need to be.

REVIEWS

"The book is GREAT ... in a great tradition of critiques of society that also help us re-orient our parenting ... beautifully lucid and readable."
Steve Biddulph, author of The Secrets of Happy Children

"Insightful and shrewd"
Sir Anthony Seldon, Leading educationalist

"A highly readable, well-balanced, well-argued contribution to the rapidly-growing mountain of parenting books, with plenty of practical, achievable advice for anyone who wants to escape from the tiger race."
Sue Palmer, author of Toxic Childhood

"A fantastic book which gives children back their childhood"
Dr David Whitebread, Senior Lecturer in Psychology of Education at Cambridge University

 

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MUM HACKS: Time-saving tips to calm the chaos of family life

Parenting has come to feel like an unwinnable race against a stop-watch.

One in three families now has both parents in full-time work. Another two million parents are raising kids on their own.

On top of that, economic uncertainty, the long hours culture and the creeping tendrils of technology which means work follows us home, results in UK parents working longer days than any other nation in Europe.

Pulled in every direction, the result is that many of today's mums and dads spend most of their time feeling burnt-out, and struggling to keep up. 

And it's not just us who are feeling stressed. Our children are feeling it too.

This book is about changing that.

It offers hundreds of ingenious ways to streamline the tasks parents need to do every day to keep their show on the road – without the cortisol-inducing rows and panics.

REVIEWS

"Brilliant ways to calm your chaos"
- The Daily Mirror

"Tanith's writing style is fun, approachable and down-to-earth and her ideas will ring bells with all mums trying to avoid meltdowns while trying to keep the home in order at the same time as continuing working life."
Mother and Baby

"Full of creative, clever ideas to help you parenting life run much more smoothly."
Becky Goddard-Hill of babybudgeting.co.uk

 

NEVER KISS A MAN IN A CANOE: Word of Wisdom from the Golden Age of Agony Aunts

Having trawled the archives of magazines and newspapers, many long-forgotten, author Tanith Carey has gathered together this fascinating collection of advice from agony aunts' columns through the 'golden' years; from the end of the 19th century through to the beginning of the Swinging Sixties. 

Never Kiss a Man in a Canoe harks back to a time when agony aunts played a crucial role in educating, remonstrating and scolding the masses. From advice on the immorality of reading a crime novel or riding a bike to Sunday school, to learning about etiquette and how to make a boy into a man, this book is a slap in the face for everyone accustomed to the politically correct advice of today. It's a fascinating tribute to the manners of the past that will make you grateful times have moved on.

The book was serialised in the The Daily Mail, The Daily Express, The Daily Mirror and The Week, featured in BBC Two's QI and was named one of best humour books of the year by the Sunday Telegraph.

REVIEWS

"Hilarious"
Daily Mirror

"Arresting"
The Guardian

"Fascinating"
The Sunday Times

"Good for a hoot on a girls' night out"
The Sunday Telegraph

"Both a comic look at outdated mores from times that are happily gone by, and a reminder of how little has really changed this offers much that is still relevant to today's girl-about-town."
The Independent on Sunday.